eBooks

Enjoy your favourite authors and books in eBook format! Be inspired by our featured titles or browse our entire ebook catalogue. If you have any questions, help is at hand in our FAQs.

Read them first Six new crime and thriller titles by the best international and local authors added each month! Read them first
Helping you to decide what to read next The Random House New Books App for iPad and iPhone is free to download from the App store! Find your next great read by browsing our new releases and sample chapters. Helping you to decide what to read next
Short and Sweet A collection of short stories and works exclusively available in ebook format featuring top international and local Random House authors. Short and Sweet

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Latest eBooks

More Latest eBooks
Invisible, James Patterson 5 stars 3 comments
Tenderness: Short Stories, Sarah Quigley 0 stars 0 comments
The Corners of the Globe: (The Wide World - James Maxted 2), Robert Goddard 4 stars 1 comments
Journey to a Hanging, Peter Wells 0 stars 0 comments
Louise Nicholas: My Story, Louise Nicholas 0 stars 0 comments
Donnel's Promise, Anna Mackenzie 0 stars 0 comments
A Song for Issy Bradley, Carys Bray 5 stars 1 comments
How to Build a Girl, Caitlin Moran 4 stars 1 comments
The Extraordinary Journey of the Fakir Who Got Trapped in an Ikea Wardrobe, Romain Puertolas 0 stars 0 comments
An Appetite For Wonder: The Making of a Scientist, Richard Dawkins 0 stars 0 comments

Digital Only

More Digital Only
Not a Drill (A Jack Reacher short story), Lee Child 3 stars 2 comments
The Truth About Pretty Girls (Short Story), Karin Slaughter 5 stars 1 comments
High Heat: (A Jack Reacher Novella), Lee Child 4 stars 3 comments
Busted, Karin Slaughter 5 stars 3 comments
I've Been Thinking About You, Sister, Witi Ihimaera 0 stars 0 comments
The Night I Got My Tuckie, Stephanie Johnson 0 stars 0 comments
The Spare Room, Judith White 0 stars 0 comments
Pigeon Post, Peter Hawes 5 stars 1 comments
The Bugger, Julian Novitz 0 stars 0 comments
Rain, Shonagh Koea 0 stars 0 comments
The Strange Case of the Disappearing Body, Fiona Farrell 0 stars 0 comments
Recreation, Sue Orr 0 stars 0 comments
The Olive Grove, Charlotte Grimshaw 0 stars 0 comments
In the Palace Gardens, Sarah Quigley 0 stars 0 comments
Sojourn in Arles, Owen Marshall 0 stars 0 comments
Little Joker Sings, Peter Wells 0 stars 0 comments

eBook Retailers

Amazon
Ebooks.com
iBooks
Kobo.com

eBook FAQ's

What is an eBook?

An ebook is a book that has been transferred to a digital copy to be read and stored on an ereader device (see 'What are e-readers?). They are also called e-books, electronic books, or digital books.

Ebooks can be purchased, freely downloaded or streamed from selected websites to an ereader device. In most cases an ebook file is saved permanently on the device, but some files can be set to be temporary (eg renting an ebook from your local library).

There are thousands of ebooks online, and they come in many types of files. Naturally, these files don't necessarily work on all of the devices, for example Amazon.com ebooks can't be read on Sony ereading devices.

The most common format of ebook is called an .epub. This is a type of file which is 'reflowable'; that is, the text adjusts in size and layout when presented on different sized screens. Most devices on the market can read these files and publishers prefer them as they can be protected by digital rights management (DRM) which ensures the book can't be copied, printed, swapped or pirated by third parties.

Another common format of ebook is .azw. This is a format made by Amazon.com whose DRM means it is exclusively for the Amazon Kindle reading device and like .epub also has reflowable text. Only Kindles are allowed to read these files, however Amazon have so many ebooks in their catalogue that it is rare that a new book is not available on their device.

The final common sort of file is the .pdf file. You probably already use these files on your home or work computer. While .pdf files may look like an ebook, they are not reflowable and are generally intended as a print file. .pdfs are often used as the best format for free books or illustration-heavy text books. However as these files can't be protected from piracy, printing or file transfer, they tend to not be used by publishers.

What is an e-reader?

 

An e-reader (also called e-book reader, e-book device) is a portable electronic device dedicated to presenting ebooks in an easy-to-read digital format. 
An average e-reader will store thousands of books at a time.
 
Most are able to connect and browse the internet wirelessly. Some models can connect to cell phone 3g networks just like smart phones.
 
There are hundreds of different types of e-readers on the market, however,  the most common models used in New Zealand are the Kindle, Sony Reader and Kobo. 
 
 
Most ereaders have electronic ink screens (eInk). Meaning they have the appearance of paper and don't strain eyes like traditional computer screens. This is because the screen reflects light, rather than projects it like LCD monitors on phones and computer monitors. Currently eInk only comes in black and white which restricts what sorts of books are ideal for the technology (colourful illustrated books don't look good on them). eInk screens use very little power to run and some readers can last an entire month before needing another charge.
 
There are also ereaders on the market which use traditional LCD screens. They of course are able to view colour heavy books and images with much better quality, but as LCD screens need much more power to run, they tend to require recharging everyday.

What is a tablet?

 

Tablets are a device commonly used for reading ebooks (also called tablet personal computer, or tablet PC) and are a hybrid of a personal computer or laptop and a smart-phone.
 
Tablets use traditional computing software and presentation. They tend to be touch screen operated and can fulfill the role of a simplistic home computer. However, they lack the complexity and power that Windows or Mac OS requires so advanced computer users should do their research before throwing out their PC in favour of a tablet. 
 
The Apple iPad is the most notable of these devices, but other companies make them, such as Samsung's Galaxy, Amazon's Kindle Fire or HP's Compaq tablets and more besides. 
 
Tablets require full ranges of colour and touch capability so therefore need LCD screens. As LCD screens project light they can be viewed in very low light.  The combination of computing power, LCD screen and larger battery requirements makes tablets considerably heavier than ereaders. Also, due to high power consumption the battery life of a tablet is much less than an eInk capable e-reader, and tend to require recharge every day or so depending on usage. That said, like most electronic devices, each progressive generation of tablet is getting lighter in weight, longer life batteries and more powerful. 
 
PC computers, laptops and smart-phones are also able to read e-reader files, though a reader app is required and due to the lack of convenience of a PC or the small screen size of a phone. the reading experience is much less satisfying and intuitive than when using an e-reader or tablet.

Why buy an eBook?

 eBooks can be stored on your computer or eBook reader and carried wherever you want. eBooks can be downloaded quickly, have features that allow you to search for text, look up words in a dictionary, and some readers allow you to make notes and some may contain extra content. If reading an eBook on a device connected to the internet, some hyperlinks could be active, and you will be able to click through to the link.

Why buy an ereader?

Everyone has differing reasons to read or not read e-books. There is certainly a large community of readers who simply can’t imagine putting down a traditional printed book in favour of a screen. However there are many benefits to e-readers which should be considered before giving them the cold shoulder:

Storage – without a doubt the most siginifcant benefit of an e-reader is their ability to store many hundreds of books in a small device. In the modern world, very few have space in their houses for libraries of books. An e-reader can be an invaluable de-clutter device particularly suited to apartment living and those who travel frequently.

Weight – Dedicated e-readers often weigh less than an average book. This makes them very portable and very helpful to those who are unable to lift much weight. As the technology and manufacturing improves, each subsequent generation has become lighter to hold and many are lighter than a traditional paperback.

Font (text) sizes – The font size is adjustable in e-books which is very useful for those with vision impairment.

Instant purchasing – ebooks can be purchased instantly from the minute of publication and are often cheaper than their paper counterparts.

Exclusive content – Some books (often short stories) are only available as digital ebooks. They can be a great way to stay in touch with your favourite authors and receive extra content, and a good way for authors to offer individual short stories to readers (in print books, short stories are often only available in compendiums of many short stories).

Stock levels – ebooks are never out of stock and assuming it's online, will never need to be out of print, so if you have a hankering for a title asap you'll always be able to get it fast.

Where can I purchase Random House eBooks and e-readers?

Our titles are available to New Zealanders through: 

Click here to see a selection of the exciting eBook titles available.

How many eBooks does Random House New Zealand have?

 We currently have approximately 10,000+ eBooks ready to read, including international and New Zealand titles, and an ongoing eBook program of new releases. Click here to see a selection of the exciting titles available now in eBook format!

What format are Random House New Zealand eBooks in?

 Our eBooks are available in ePub format. An ePub (electronic publication) is a free and open eBook standard for 'reflowable' content, meaning that the text display can be optimized depending on the device or hardware being used. It has been embraced by most publishing and technology companies around the world.

Will Random House New Zealand release eBooks to coincide with the publication of the physical book?

 Yes. Our goal is to minimise delay and to release eBooks at the same time as the new physical book hits bookshops, so that you have greater choice.

Will Random House New Zealand release illustrated eBooks?

 Yes but currently we only have a limited range available. We are still investigating ways to publish more illustrated eBooks, including children's picture books, that will be of a high standard and hope to have more available shortly.

What price are Random House New Zealand eBooks?

 The retail prices of our eBooks are displayed by retailers and may vary.

I can't find the book I want to buy in eBook format, why isn't it available?

At Random House our aim is to have all our books available to purchase in eBook format as quickly as possible. However, there are a number of processes that need to be completed before a book can be made into an eBook, including approval from the author and agent, conversion to the appropriate eBook format, and delivery to suppliers. Some of these processes can take longer than expected. If you would like more information on a particular title or author, please contact Customer Service at admin@randomhouse.co.nz or phone 09 441 2710.

Why is the book I want to buy available as an eBook in other countries, but not available in New Zealand?

Some books are published by various publishing companies throughout different regions of the world. Each company will have their own eBook publishing schedule and will need to seek approval from the author or agent to publish a book into eBook format in their particular region. At Random House our aim is to have all our books available to purchase in eBook format as quickly as possible, but we must first ensure that the appropriate author/agent approval is completed in order for the eBook conversion to take place. If you would like more information on a particular title or author, please contact us on admin@randomhouse.co.nz.

What format of eBook is right for my device?

 

There are thousands of ebooks online, and they come in many types of files. Naturally, these files don't necessarily work on all of the devices, for example Amazon.com ebooks can't be read on Sony ereading devices. This is achieved with digital rights management (DRM), which locks the file to the device.
 
The three current formats most in use today are:
  • epub ebook – most ereaders can use epub files, and most ebook retailers sell these.
  • azw or Kindle ebook – Amazon bought ebooks only work on Amazon Kindles
  • PDF – Not a true ebook. PDF's are print files that can be viewed on ereaders.
Here's some more details about the files and why they differ.
 
Epub – most devices use this type
The most common format of ebook is called an .epub. This is a type of file which is 'reflowable'; that is, the text adjusts in size and layout when presented on different sized screens. Most devices on the market can read these files and publishers prefer them as they can be protected by digital rights management (DRM) which ensures the book can't be copied, printed, swapped or pirated by third parties.
 
Azw or kindle ebook – Amazon ebooks can only be used on Amazon Kindles
Another common format of ebook is .azw. This is a format made by Amazon.com whose DRM means it is exclusively for the Amazon Kindle reading device and like .epub also has reflowable text. Only Kindles are allowed to read these files, however Amazon have so many ebooks in their catalogue that it is rare that a new book is not available on their device.
 
PDFs – Not a true ebook, but it works
The final common sort of file is the .pdf file. You probably already use these files on your home or work computer. While .pdf files may look like an ebook, they are not reflowable and are generally intended as a print file. .pdfs are often used as the best format for free books or illustration-heavy text books. However as these files can't be protected from piracy, printing  or file transfer, they tend to not be used by publishers.

Can you print an eBook out?

No, the digital rights management of an eBook does not allow this.

Can you copy ebook files and share them?

No, generally you are not allowed or able to share ebook files or distribute ebooks where this contradicts the copyright of the title. Many online retailers allow you to gift ebooks though you will not get access to the file. Some files are free and can be freely copied in accordance to the publishers stipulations.

Can you gift ebooks?

Yes, many of the best ebook websites allow you to buy and send ebook files to friends and family. Each site will differ as do the file formats so do a little research about what device the recipient owns, how the website works and how the file is distributed before buying a ebook as a gift.

Can you change languages within an ebook?

Not at present, you must look for a correct language translation should you require a different language.

Are ebooks cheaper than their print cousins?

Generally, but not always. Like their print editions, each shop will price their goods differently and the RRP of a title can be different between countries. Shop around just as you would in the real world and look for the best prices.

eBooks Glossary

Glossary of ebook terms:

ebook or e-book, eBook, digital book; is a book-length publication in digital form, consisting of text, images, or both, and produced on, published through, and readable on computers or other electronic devices.

eInk or electronic paper – A type of electronic paper used in many eReader screens. eInk screens have ultra low power consumption allowing the device to operate for a long time between charges (a whole month in some cases). As the screen reflects light rather than projects it (giving it a paper look); it is able to be read in direct sunlight. New versions of eInk screens such as eInk Pearl are touch screen capable. The latest type is eInk Triton which is in colour.

ereader – An e-book reader, also called an e-book device or e-reader, is a portable electronic device that is designed primarily for the purpose of reading digital books and periodicals.

File formats – There are many different types of eBook file. The main three are: .azw Amazon.com's file available for use only on Kindle .epub Open source file available to everyone and without DRM .pdf Adobe print file (doesn't deliver the true eBook experience such as font control)

Tablet or tablet computer, is a complete mobile computer, larger than a mobile phone or personal digital assistant, integrated into a flat touch screen and primarily operated by touching the screen.

Digital Rights Management or DRM – A term describing access control technologies that are used by hardware manufacturers, publishers, copyright holders and individuals to limit the use of digital content and devices. Amazon use DRM to restrict Amazon eBooks to Kindles only.

Reflowable text – certain digital formats of ebook are reflowable, meaning the text will change size and shape to fit any device used to view it. Font size can be increased or decreased for the comfort of the reader.